Bhimashankar Jyotirlinga Temple in Pune Maharashtra

Bhimashankar Temple, one of the 12 Jyotirlinga temples dedicated to Lord Shiva, is situated in Bhavagiri (Bhorgiri) village, 50 km north-west of Khed, in Maharashtra, India. Bhimashankar Shiva Mandir is about 110 km from Pune in the Ghat region of the Sahyadri hills (Sahayadri Ranges). The temple is situated on the banks of River Bhima, it is from here Bhima Rive flows south east and merges with the Krishna River near Raichur. Bhima Shankar Temple gives a beautiful view of the forts, the rivers and the hill stations nearby. Grishneshwar Temple near Ellora and Trimbakeshwar Temple (Tryambakeshwar) near Nashik are the other two Jyotirlinga temples of Shiva in Maharashtra.

Bhimashankar Temple Architecture

Dating back to the 18th century, the Bhimashankar Jyothirlinga Temple was built by a Peshwa ruler in the Nagara style of architecture and also has influences from the Indo Aryan style of architecture. The temple has a wooden entrance which is beautifully carved. This ancient Jyothirlinga temple is said to have constructed over a Swayambhu (self-emanated) Shiva Linga. The sanctum is seen at a lower level. The pillars and gateways of the temple are adorned with carvings of scenes from mythology. Nana Phadnavis, (a great prime minister of the Maratha Empire during the Peshwa rule in Pune), built the shikhara (the rising tower) of the temple. There is also a small temple dedicated to Lord Shani within the Bhimshankar temple premises. At the entrance of the temple is the image of Nandi (the celestial bull).

Bhimashankar Temple Jyotirlinga Shiva Shrine in Pune

A shrine dedicated to Kamalaja, an incarnation of Goddess Parvati, is situated near the Bhimashankara Temple. Kamalaja is said to have helped Shiva in his battle against Tripurasura. There are also images of the Shivaganas (Shiva Ganas) - Shaakini and Daakini, who helped Shiva in the battle against the demon. Lord Shiva was called Tripurantaka, for his destruction of Tripurasura. A holy tank called Mokshakund thirtha is located behind the Bhimashankara temple. It is where the Rishi Kaushika is said to have taken bath. Other important thirthas are the Sarvathirtha, the Kusharanya thirtha where the Bhima River begins to flow eastward, and the Jyanakund. 

Bhimashankar Temple Puja Timings

The temple is opened from 04:30 AM to 11.30 AM. Shringar Darshan is from 3:30 PM to 7:30 PM (except Pradosham on Monday or Amavasya or Grahan or Mahashivratri. Kartihik Month, Shravan Month - No Mukut and no Shringar Darshans).

Evening Aarti is conducted from 7:30 PM to 8:00 PM. Darshans from 8:00 to 9:30 PM and the temple is closed at 9:30 pm.

The temple opens daily at 4:30 am and closes at 7:30 PM. The time for normal darshans at Bhimashankar Temple are from 5:15 AM to 11:30 AM, 12:30 PM to 2:30 PM, and 3:30 PM to 7:30 PM. No Abhishekam will be done between 11:30 am to 11:50 am.

Bhimashankar Temple Festivals

Mahashivratri is the major famous Hindu festival celebrated here in a grand scale.

Best Time to Visit Bhimashankar Temple in Maharashtra

Best time to visit Bhimashankar shrine is from August to February. Though, anytime of the year is good to visit Bhimashankar, it is better to avoid visiting the place during summer and during monsoon when trekking is not advisable. 

Tourist Attractions near Bhimashankar Temple

Bhimashankar Wildlife Sanctuary is the major tourist place to visit near Bhimashankar Temple. The Giant Indian Squirrel is one of the most important attractions of the sanctuary.

Bhimashankar Wildlife Sanctuary Maharashtra

The Hanuman Lake, Gupt Bhimashankar (source of river Bhima), Gupta Bhimesh, Nag Phani Peak (Nagphani or Duke’s Nose), Bombay Point, Sakshi Vinayak, Shivneri Fort, and Dimbhe Dam are other tourist places to visit in Pune while visiting Bhimashankar Temple.

How to reach Bhimashankar Temple in Pune

By Flight / Air

Pune Lohegaon Airport is the nearest airport.

By Train

Karjat Railway Station, managed by the Central Railways, is the nearest railhead to reach Bhimashankar Temple is at Pune. The temple can be reached from Karjat on the Pune - Mumbai section of the Central railway.

By Bus / Road

Easiest way to reach Bhimashankar Temple by road is to drive from Pune along the Pune - Nasik highway and turn off at Manchar, situated around 65 km from Pune. Bhimashankar is around 68 km from Manchar. (Driving route will be like this Pune - Rajguru Nagar - Manchar - Ghodegoan - Bhimashakar)

If coming from Mumbai Take Mumbai Pune Expressway, exit at Talegaon, from Talegaon – Chakan - Left Turn - Rajgurunagar - Manchar - Left Turn Drive 50 km Bhimashankar

State buses ply from Pune to Bhimashankar twice a week. During the Mahasivaratri festival, buses ply frequently. As there is no proper road from Karjat to Bhimashankar, pilgrims who wish to go on foot during festivals use this road. Pilgrims near Mumbai drop in to Bhimashankar from Karjat via Khandas.

Accommodation Facilities / Hotels near Bhimashankar Temple

Bluemormon Resort is the main good resort / hotel available near Bhimashankar Temple. The hotel is about 9 km away from the temple.

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Related Posts

Somnath Jyothirlinga Temple in Gujarat
Kashi Vishwanath Temple in Varanasi 
Kedarnath Chardham Temple in Himalayas


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5 comments:

  1. There is a minuscule shrine that is devoted to Lord Shani within the temple area. A statue of Nandi, Lord Shiva’s Vahan, or transport, is placed right at the entry point of the temple. The shikara, or the superstructure of the sanctum, was built by Nana Phadnavis. There is a new dharamshala that is being built now.

    ReplyDelete
  2. with reference to reach temple by road...it is mentioned the state bus run twice a week...i visited the temple 10 dayz back...i saw three msrtc buses from pune to bhimashankar temple...from 9.30 am to 11.30 am

    ReplyDelete
  3. HOW TO REACH FOR DARSHAN BY BUS FROM NASHIK / PUNE FROM

    WHICH PLACE IT IS BEST AND WHETHER BUSES ARE AVALAIBLE

    ReplyDelete
  4. Now to reach Bhimashankar from Delhi by train and bus.

    ReplyDelete
  5. how to reach from pune railway station to temple

    ReplyDelete

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